Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of commercial copaiba (Copaifera spp.) oils against bacterial pathogens isolated from postoperative mammoplasty surgery

Authors

  • Raquel Costa Machado Laboratory of Preclinical Research of Natural Products, Postgraduate Program in Medicinal Plants and Phytotherapics in Basic Attention, Paranaense University, Umuarama, PR, Brazil. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1489-9024
  • Ana Karina Vargas Soares Laboratory of Preclinical Research of Natural Products, Paranaense University, Umuarama, PR, Brazil. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6076-166X
  • Isabela Carvalho dos Santos Laboratory of Microbiology of Natural Products, Postgraduate Program in Animal Science with Emphasis on Bioactive Products, Paranaense University, Umuarama, PR, Brazil. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7971-5126
  • Wanessa de Campos Bortolucci Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Products, Postgraduate Program in Biotechnology Applied to the Agriculture, Paranaense University, Umuarama, PR, Brazil https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7233-8313
  • Luis Fernando Espinoza Luizar Laboratory of Preclinical Research of Natural Products, Paranaense University, Umuarama, PR, Brazil. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4952-3286
  • Caio Franco de Araújo Almeida Campos Postgraduate Program in Clean Technologies, UniCesumar University, Maringá, PR, Brazil. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5689-4785
  • José Eduardo Gonçalves Postgraduate Program in Clean Technologies, Clean Technologies and Cesumar Institute of Science, Technologies and Innovation – ICETI, UniCesumar University, Maringá, PR, Brazil. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2505-0536
  • Lidiane Nunes Barbosa Laboratory of Microbiology of Natural Products, Postgraduate Program in Animal Science with Emphasis on Bioactive Products, Paranaense University, Umuarama, PR, Brazil. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5762-8091
  • Samantha Wietzikoski Laboratory of Preclinical Research of Natural Products, Paranaense University, Umuarama, PR, Brazil. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4611-6642
  • Lisiane de Almeida Martins Laboratory of Microbiology of Natural Products, Postgraduate Program in Animal Science with Emphasis on Bioactive Products, Paranaense University, Umuarama, PR, Brazil. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0700-2634
  • Zilda Cristiani Gazim 3Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Products, Postgraduate Program in Biotechnology Applied to the Agriculture, Paranaense University, Umuarama, PR, Brazil https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0392-5976
  • Francislaine Aparecida dos Reis Lívero Laboratory of Preclinical Research of Natural Products, Postgraduate Program in Medicinal Plants and Phytotherapics in Basic Attention, Postgraduate Program in Animal Science with Emphasis on Bioactive Products, Paranaense University, Umuarama, PR, Brazil. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6533-0850
  • Evellyn Claudia Wietzikoski Lovato Universidade Paranaense https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8511-0086

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33448/rsd-v9i10.8593

Keywords:

Microbial viability; Gram-negative bacteria; Gram-positive bacteria; Mammoplasty; Staphylococcus aureus.

Abstract

Plastic surgeries are considered clean or potentially contaminated procedures. The incidence of infection in reduction mammoplasty is 1.1 to 22% and the main etiological agents are bacteria found on the skin and mucous membranes such as Staphylococcus aureus. Due to the increase in bacterial resistance with the widespread use of antibiotics, identify natural compounds with antibacterial action on postoperative surgery wounds are fundamental. Thus, the objective of this research was the identification of compounds and assessment of the antibacterial action of Copaifera spp. (copaiba) oil against standard strains and bacterial pathogens isolated from postoperative mammoplasty surgery. For this, four commercial copaiba oils (1, 2, 3 and 4) were submitted to a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. The in-vitro antimicrobial activity and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of oils on standard strains and clinical samples, as well as the disk antibiotics sensitivity and the synergistic effect of the oils and antibiotics, were assessed. A total of 72 compounds were identified, accounting for ~99% of the volatile constituents in the oils. Sesquiterpenes comprised 67.24– 90.11% of the components, with β-caryophyllene being the most common. Oils 1 and 2 were the most active on the S. aureus strain, with MIC similarto Oil 3, while Oil 4presented no activity. The same pattern was observed in the clinical samples. In addition, Oil 2 presented synergism when associated with amoxicillin. The synergistic effects of Copaiba oils may represent a source of therapeutic compounds against bacterial infections in surgical wound.

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Published

23/09/2020

How to Cite

MACHADO, R. C. .; SOARES, A. K. V. .; SANTOS, I. C. dos .; BORTOLUCCI, W. de C. .; LUIZAR, L. F. E. .; CAMPOS, C. F. de A. A. .; GONÇALVES, J. E. .; BARBOSA, L. N. .; WIETZIKOSKI, S.; MARTINS, L. de A. .; GAZIM, Z. C. .; LÍVERO, F. A. dos R. .; LOVATO, E. C. W. . Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of commercial copaiba (Copaifera spp.) oils against bacterial pathogens isolated from postoperative mammoplasty surgery. Research, Society and Development, [S. l.], v. 9, n. 10, p. e1869108593, 2020. DOI: 10.33448/rsd-v9i10.8593. Disponível em: https://www.rsdjournal.org/index.php/rsd/article/view/8593. Acesso em: 18 aug. 2022.

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Health Sciences